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Effect of therapeutic horseback riding on posture in children with cerebral palsy.

Bertoti DB.: Phys Ther, 1988, 68: 1505–1512. [PubMed]

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to measure postural changes in children with spastic cerebral palsy after participation in a therapeutic horseback riding program. Eleven children with moderate to severe spastic cerebral palsy, aged 2 years 4 months to 9 years 6 months, were selected for this study and underwent postural assessments according to a repeated-measures design.

 

Assessment of posture was performed by a panel of three pediatric physical therapists, using a postural assessment scale designed by the author. A composite score for each test interval was calculated for each child, and a median score was calculated for the entire group at each test interval. Data were analyzed using a Friedman test, assuming an alpha level of .05.

 

A statistically significant difference was found between the three test intervals with significant improvement occurring during the period of therapeutic riding. Clinical improvements were also noted in muscle tone and balance as evidenced by improved functional skills. These results constitute the first objective measure supporting the efficacy of therapeutic horseback riding on posture in children with cerebral palsy.

Effect of therapeutic horseback riding on posture in children with cerebral palsy.

Bertoti DB.: Phys Ther, 1988, 68: 1505–1512. [PubMed]

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to measure postural changes in children with spastic cerebral palsy after participation in a therapeutic horseback riding program. Eleven children with moderate to severe spastic cerebral palsy, aged 2 years 4 months to 9 years 6 months, were selected for this study and underwent postural assessments according to a repeated-measures design.

 

Assessment of posture was performed by a panel of three pediatric physical therapists, using a postural assessment scale designed by the author. A composite score for each test interval was calculated for each child, and a median score was calculated for the entire group at each test interval. Data were analyzed using a Friedman test, assuming an alpha level of .05.

 

A statistically significant difference was found between the three test intervals with significant improvement occurring during the period of therapeutic riding. Clinical improvements were also noted in muscle tone and balance as evidenced by improved functional skills. These results constitute the first objective measure supporting the efficacy of therapeutic horseback riding on posture in children with cerebral palsy.

The effect of therapeutic horseback riding on social functioning in children with autism.

J Autism Dev Disord. 2009 Sep;39(9):1261-7. doi: 10.1007/s10803-009-0734-3. Epub 2009 Apr 7.

Bass MM1, Duchowny CA, Llabre MM.

  • Good Hope Equestrian Training Center, Homestead, FL, USA.

Abstract

This study evaluated the effects of therapeutic horseback riding on social functioning in children with autism. We hypothesized that participants in the experimental condition (n = 19), compared to those on the wait-list control (n = 15), would demonstrate significant improvement in social functioning following a 12-weeks horseback riding intervention.

 

Autistic children exposed to therapeutic horseback riding exhibited greater sensory seeking, sensory sensitivity, social motivation, and less inattention, distractibility, and sedentary behaviors.

 

The results provide evidence that therapeutic horseback riding may be a viable therapeutic option in treating children with autism spectrum disorders.

"It's like being in another world": Demonstrating the benefits of therapeutic horseback riding for individuals with psychiatric disability. Bizub, Anne L.; Joy, Ann; Davidson, Larry American Psychological Association, PsycARTICLES :

Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, Vol 26(4), 2003, 377-384.

Citation and Abstract

Five adults with longstanding histories of psychiatric disabilities were recruited for a ten-week therapeutic horseback riding program. Individuals learned basic riding skills and had the opportunity to bond with a horse. In addition, the riders participated in a post-riding process group that used artistic and creative exercises to promote individual expression.

 

By the end of ten weeks, the riders reported success in learning basic horsemanship and, in doing so, also reported additional psychosocial benefits, including an augmented sense of self-efficacy and self-esteem. In sum, this adjunctive therapy can facilitate the recovery process.

The Effectiveness of Hippotherapy for Children With Language-Learning Disabilities

Beth L. Macauley

Karla M. Gutierrez


First Published September 1, 2004 Article Type: research-article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/15257401040250040501

The University of Alabama, Washington State University

 

Abstract

This study examined the effectiveness of hippotherapy versus traditional therapy for children with language-learning disabilities. Three boys, ages 9, 10, and 12 years, and their parents independently completed a satisfaction questionnaire at the end of traditional therapy (T1) and again at the end of hippotherapy (T2). A comparison of the responses from T1 and T2 indicated that both the parents and the children reported improvement in speech and language abilities after both therapies.

 

Overall, responses were noticeably higher following hippotherapy, with additional benefits of improved motivation and attention also reported.